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Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2017: Bridlington to Scarborough

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2017: race report

Finish of Stage 1, TDY 2017

Dylan Groenewegen (Lotto JumboNL-Jumbo) pips Caleb Ewan (Orica-Scott) to the victory on Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2017 in Scarborough, picture by SWPix.com

Dylan Groenewegen won the first stage of the 2017 Tour de Yorkshire in Scarborough, in a bunch sprint.

There was an 8-man breakaway, and the last survivors, Perrig Quéméneur and Conor Dunne, were caught with 8.3km to go. That meant that it came down to a bunch sprint in Scarborough. Cofidis led out for Nacer Bouhanni, and Sky were looking after Danny van Poppel, but it was Groenewegen who timed his charge for the line correctly, holding off a fast-finishing Caleb Ewan by less than half a wheel.

There was a crash behind, involving Magnus Cort Neilsen, which resulted in broken collar bones for Cort Neilsen, Russell Downing, and Marco Haller.

This is a highlights video of the stage:

Stage 1, Tour de Yorskhire 2017: route guide

North Sea coast & Robin Hood's Bay

North Sea coast & Robin Hood's Bay, on the route of Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2017

Stage 1 of the 2017 Tour de Yorkshire is 173km from Bridlington to Scarborough

The riders start on the seafront in Bridlington, and head west via Driffield to Pocklington for the first intermediate sprint. They then turn northwards, tackling the Côte de Garrowby Hill on the way to Malton and Pickering. In the North York Moors National Park, they climb the Côte de Goathland, before continuing to Whitby for the second and final intermediate sprint. The route then follows the coast south via Robin Hood's Bay, to the traditional finish at Scarborough's North Bay. 

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2017: maps

This is a map of Stage 1 of the 2017 Tour de Yorkshire.

The stage route and profile are shown on this video:

This is Welcome to Yorkshire/Tour de Yorkshire's map of Stage 1:

Map of Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2017

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2017: timings & video preview

These are the estimated timings for Stage 1, based on projected average speeds of 39, 41, and 43kmh.

Welcome to Yorkshire have produced a video preview of Stage 1, with British champion Adam Blythe.

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2017: the start in Bridlington

Bridlington Harbour

Bridlington Harbour, by Matthew Wilkinson, Flickr, Licence CC BY-ND 2.0

Stage 1 starts on the seafront at Bridlington.

The neutralised section is from Marine Drive, along South Cliff Road, Bridge Street/Queen Street, Cross Street, Promenade/B1254/Flamborough Road/Fortyfoot/Sewerby Heads, B1255/Marton Road, A165/Bessingby Hill, and A164. The flag goes down and the racing starts on the A614 near West Hill.

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2017: Bridlington to Pocklington

Burton Agnes Hall

Burton Agnes Hall, Yaffa Phillips, Flickr, Licence CC BY-SA 2.0

The riders follow the A614 to Carnaby (with Carnaby Temple, otherwise known as the pepperpot, about a mile north of the village) and Burton Agnes (known for its Elizabethan stately home, Burton Agnes Hall).

At Driffield, the race turns off the A614, to take Scarborough Road/Windmill Hill/North Street/Middle Street North to Market Place in the centre of the town. The riders leave on Middle Street South/Beverley Road/A164, and rejoin the A614 at Kelleythorpe.

Driffield Post Office

Driffield Post Office, Barry W, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

Stage 1 continues on the A614 to Kirkburn, then forks right on the B1246 to North Dalton. Beyond North Dalton, the terrain is rolling. After the village of Warter, the road passes through the shooting estate (sad people only) of Warter Priory, and reaches a height of 155m. The route then descends to Pocklington, where the first intermediate sprint takes place - the line being at the junction of the B1246 and Percy Road.

Pocklington

Pocklington, by Keith Laverack, Flickr, Licence CC BY-ND 2.0

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2017: Pocklington to Pickering

York House, Malton

York House, Malton, by Tim Green, Licence CC BY 2.0

Stage 1 heads north from Pocklington on The Mile, then continues to Meltonby and Bishop Wilton. Beyond Bishop Wilton, the route meets the A166, where it turns right. This is the start of the categorised climb of the Côte de Garrowby Hill, which takes the riders from a height of 70m, up to 236m, over a distance of about 1.8km.

Soon after the top of the climb, the riders turn left on the Roman Road to Uncleby Wold, and on to Birdsall House (more shooting - numpties who need a nicer hobby). They continue north across Langton Wold to Norton-on-Derwent and Malton.

The race leaves Malton on the B1257 to Swinton (the name of the village coming from Swintune, meaning 'pig farm') and Amotherby. At Amotherby, it takes a minor road north, to cross the river Rye on Newsham bridge. The flat country here is part of the Vale of Pickering, which separates the Yorkshire Wolds to the south from the North York Moors to the north. The route passes through the villages of Great Barugh, Little Barugh, and Kirby Misperton - the location of an unwanted attempt to frack the rocks for gas.

Shortly after Kirby Misperton, the riders meet the A169, where they turn left to Pickering.

Pickering

Pickering, by Chris, Licence CC BY-SA 2.0

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2017: Pickering to Whitby

Hole of Horcum

Hole of Horcum, by Thomas Tolkein, Licence CC BY 2.0

Leaving Pickering, the race heads north on the A169, between the North York Moors railway and Dalby Forest, towards Lockton. The road ascends towards Saltergate, and there's a view of the Hole of Horcum to the left.

After crossing Lockton High Moor, the riders reach Eller Beck Bridge, then turn left on a minor road across Goathland Moor, and pass under the railway line. At the next junction, they turn right to the village of Goathland. In Goathland, they go over the railway and Eller Beck, then begin the climb out of the village, the Côte de Goathland.

Goathland

Goathland, by Lawrence Lee, Licence CC BY 2.0

After the top of the climb, the route rejoins the A169 to cross Sleights Moor. Now the riders are on the route of Stage 3 of the 2016 Tour de Yorkshire.

Sleights Moor

Sheep in the Heat Haze, Sleights Moor, by Thomas Tolkien, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

The descent of Sleights Moor on the A169 is gradual at first, then steep down Blue Bank (25% gradient) to Sleights. (Sleights is on the river Esk, and has a 'salmon leap' weir; it has a stop on the Esk Valley Line, and is on the Esk Valley Walk). 

Esk Valley Line at Ruswarp

Esk Valley Line bridge over the river Esk at Ruswarp, by Matt Buck, Flickr, Licence CC BY-SA 2.0

The riders cross the river Esk to the Briggswath side, and immediately turn right on the B1410, which follows the river Esk to Ruswarp, on the outskirts of Whitby. 

(Ruswarp is on the river Esk, and has a stop on the Esk Valley Line. It used to be called Risewarp (in the C12th), meaning 'silted land overgrown with brushwood'. Just downstream of Ruswarp is the impressive Larpool Viaduct, which carried the Scarborough-Whitby railway line, now converted into the Cinder Track walking and cycling route. Attractions in Ruswarp include Esk Leisure, and Ruswarp Pleasure Boats. The pub is the Bridge Inn).

Larpool Viaduct near Whitby

Larpool Viaduct, by Hedgehog Cycling

Stage 1 takes the B1416 up a short, steep hill out of Ruswarp, then turns right on the A171 into Whitby, left on the A174, and right down Bagdale/Victoria Square/New Quay Road to Whitby harbour. The race crosses the river Esk by the harbour on Whitby swing bridge (Bridge Street), just below Whitby Abbey. 

Whitby swing bridge

Boat going through Whitby Swing Bridge, Whitby, North Yorkshire, by Glen Bowman, Flickr, Licence CC BY-SA 2.0

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2017: Whitby to Scarborough

Whitby Abbey

Whitby Abbey, by Martyn Wright, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

The race heads away from Whitby harbour on Church Street, and climbs Green Lane. At the top of Green Lane, the riders turn right on Hawkser Lane, and the line of the second and final intermediate sprint is just after the junction. They join the A171 just before Hawkser. Hawkser is on the Cinder Track, and has a bike hire shop, café, and accommodation in train carriages.

Cinder Track at Hawkser

The Cinder Track at Hawkser, by Hedgehog Cycling

In Hawkser, the race takes the B1447 to Robin Hood's Bay.

Robin Hood's Bay

Robin Hood's Bay, by Ben Pugh, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

When they get to Robin Hood's Bay, the riders turn right on Thorpe Lane, heading away from the sea, and towards Fylingthorpe (location of the Fylingdales Inn). They go up Thorpe Bank and Sled Gates, and this is the categorised Côte de Robin Hood's Bay climb. The altitude at the junction in Robin Hood's Bay is 50m, and at the top, shortly before the junction with the A171, it is 220m. The height climbed is therefore 170m.

Fylingdales Moor

Purple heather, Fylingdales Moor, by Ben Sutherland, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

The race takes the A171 across Fylingdales Moor and Kirk Moor, past the Flask Inn, then between Stony Marl Moor to the left and Jugger Howe Moor to the right. Here, the route diverges from that of Stage 3 of the Tour de Yorkshire 2016, as it stays on the A171 through Harwood Dale Forest, to Cloughton and Burniston.

Burniston

Burniston, by Hedgehog Cycling

In Burniston, the race forks left on the A165, and enters Scarborough from the north. At Peasholm Park, the route forks left on Peasholm Road/N Marine Road/St Thomas Street/St Nicholas St. It veers left on Falconers Rd, turns right on Vernon Road, then descends to the seafront and Foreshore Rd. The riders go past the Old Harbour on Sandside, then follow Marine Drive around the Castle Cliff headland.

Marine Drive turns into Royal Albert Drive, and takes the riders to the finish line at North Bay.

Scarborough North Bay

Scarborough North Bay, by Mike Dobson, Flickr, Licence CC BY-ND 2.0


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Beryl Burton cycleway

Beryl Burton cycleway

The Beryl Burton cycleway is a traffic-free cycle and foot path between Bilton Village Farm and the Nidd at High Bridge, Knaresborough. Read aboutthe Beryl Burton cycleway.

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2017: Bridlington

Bridlington Harbour

Bridlington Harbour, by Matthew Wilkinson, Flickr, Licence CC BY-ND 2.0

Bridlington is a town on the North Sea coast, just south of Flamborough Head. A little river called the Gypsey Race runs through it.

Bridlington has probably been inhabited since the Bronze Age, and there may have been a Roman settlement. It was mentioned in the Domesday Book as Bretlinton. The town grew around an Augustinian Priory founded in 1133. 

Today, Bridlington lives mainly from tourism, but is also a minor sea fishing port, known for shellfish.

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2017: Driffield

Driffield Post Office

Driffield Post Office, Barry W, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

Driffield is a market town on the Driffield Navigation and in the Yorkshire Wolds. The name Driffield appears in the Domesday Book, and means dirty (manured) field.

The main hotel in Driffield is the Bell. The town hosts a Steam and Vintage Rally.

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2017: Pocklington

Pocklington

Pocklington, by Keith Laverack, Flickr, Licence CC BY-ND 2.0

Pocklington is a small market town in the Yorkshire Wolds, dominated by the C15th tower of All Saints' church.

In the Middle Ages, Pocklington was a local centre for trading wool. These days, it is home to many commuters to York.

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2017: Norton-on-Derwent & Malton

York House, Malton

York House, Malton, by Tim Green, Licence CC BY 2.0

Norton-on-Derwent is to the south of the river, opposite Malton. It has many horse racing stables.

Malton is a market town to the north of the river Derwent with a Roman history - the remains of the Derventio Roman fort are near the river. The fort was established under Agricola (AD40-93), and a large civilian settlement grew up alongside it. In the Norman period, there was a wooden castle here.

The Shambles in Malton grew up in the C18th. Malton has a market place, with a market every Saturday.

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2017: Pickering

Pickering

Pickering, by Chris, Licence CC BY-SA 2.0

Pickering is market town in Ryedale, North Yorkshire, just south of the North York Moors National Park. Dalby Forest, a mountain-biking venue, is to the north east of the town.

The area was inhabited in the Roman period, and the town probably existed at the time of the Anglo-Saxons. Pickering Castle was built in the late C11th, after the Norman invasion.

Other than the castle, Pickering Parish Church is a main landmark, and stands by the market place.

The terminus of the North York Moors railway is in Pickering. It's an 18-mile heritage line to Whitby.

North York Moors railway, Pickering

North York Moors railway, Pickering, by Kevin, Licence CC BY 2.0

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2017: Goathland

Goathland

Goathland, by Lawrence Lee, Licence CC BY 2.0

Goathland's name is probably a corruption of 'good land'. There was a hermitage here from 1109.

Goathland has a station on the North York Moors Railway line (which was used as the location of Hogsmeade station in the Harry Potter films). Black-faced sheep wander around the village, exercising a right to common grazing granted by landowner the Duchy of Lancaster.

The village was the location of Aidensfield in the TV series Heartbeat, set in the 1960s. 

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2017: Whitby

Whitby harbour  

Whitby harbour, by Hedgehog Cycling

Whitby is a seaside town at the mouth of the river Esk.

The settlement here was called Streanoehealh in 657AD when a monastery was founded by King Oswy of Northumbria. It became known as Witebi, meaning 'the white settlement' in Old Norse, in the C12th.

The first Abbess of the monastery was St Hilda. Caedmon was transformed into an inspired poet at the Abbey. The Synod of Whitby (664) established the date of Easter in Northumbria, the Roman date being adopted in preference to the Celtic one.

The monastery was destroyed by Danish Vikings between 867 and 870, and only re-established under the Normans in 1078, when William de Percy gave the land to the Benedictine Order.

The town of Whitby grew after the Dissolution of the Monasteries, particularly due to trade in alum found locally, and used for medicine, curing leather, and fixing dyed cloths. There was also a local shipbuilding trade, and (from 1795) Whitby became a whaling port. A whalebone arch on West Cliff commemorates this period. There's also a statue of Captain James Cook there.

Whitby was a spa town in the late 1700s and early 1800s, with visitors drawn by three 'chalybeate' springs. More tourists arrived after the Whitby and Pickering railway was built in 1839.

In the Victorian period, jet was mined from the cliffs and moors, and Whitby Jet became well-known. (The Romans had already mined jet). Jet is a mineraloid which is the compressed remains of ancestors of the monkey-puzzle tree. It can be used to make jewelry and decorative items, and Queen Victoria liked it, especially after Albert's death. Fossils have also been found in Whitby's cliffs. 

Whitby swing bridge

Boat going through Whitby Swing Bridge, Whitby, North Yorkshire, by Glen Bowman, Flickr, Licence CC BY-SA 2.0

The main industries today are fishing and tourism. Amongst other things, visitors patronise the many local fish and chip shops, including the Magpie Café. Whitby is the closest port to a proposed offshore windfarm on Dogger Bank.

Whitby is associated with Dracula, because part of Bram Stoker's novel is set here.

Whitby is twinned with Anchorage, Alaska.

Whitby Abbey

Whitby Abbey, by Martyn Wright, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2017: Robin Hood's Bay

Robin Hood's Bay

Robin Hood's Bay, by Ben Pugh, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

Robin Hood's Bay is a small fishing village within the North York Moors National Park, which is picturesque, and popular with visitors. It is built in a fissure between two steep cliffs, and most of the houses are sandstone, with red-tiled roofs.

The origin of the name is uncertain, but a legend says that Robin Hood encountered French pirates, and made them surrender. He took their loot, and returned it to the poor people of the village which is now called Robin Hood's Bay.

There were settlements slightly inland (at Raw and Fylingthorpe) in the Viking and Norman eras, but it wasn't until the 1500s that Robin Hood's Bay itself was inhabited. In 1536, about twenty fishing boats were moored here.

Robin Hood's Bay has a tradition of smuggling. There may be underground passages linking the houses. In the late 1700s, contraband tea, gin, rum, brandy, and tobacco were smuggled from the Netherlands and France. There were battles between smugglers and excise men on at least two occasions.

Fishing reached its peak in the mid-1800s, with the fish carried over the moorland to Pickering or York. Tourism generates the most income today.

The Bay is on what is sometimes called the Dinosaur Coast, and many fossils have been discovered.

Robin Hood's Bay had a station until 1965, when the Scarborough and Whitby line was closed. The old railway line is now used for the Cinder Track foot and cycle path.

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2017: Scarborough

Scarborough South Sands and Harbour

Scarborough, North Yorkshire, by Thomas Tolkien, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

Scarborough is the largest holiday resort on the Yorkshire coast. As well as tourism, Scarborians live from fishing, services, and the digital and creative industries. There's free wifi on the town's seafront and harbour.

The rocky promontory, with the ruins of Scarborough Castle on it, separates the sea front into North Bay and South Bay. South Bay is more popular and commercial, while North Bay is quieter, and has the Japanese-themed Peasholm Park. The miniature North Bay Railway runs from the park to Scalby Mills and the Sea Life Centre.

Scarborough may have been founded around 966AD as Skaroaborg by a Viking raider, but there was little left of any settlement by the time of the Domesday Book. 

Scarborough Castle was built under Henry II, and he granted charters for a market in 1155 and 1163. The royal charter for Scarborough Fair was granted in 1253. It was a 6-week trading festival, with merchants from all over Europe, and it continued for about 500 years. The castle and town suffered during the English Civil War of the 1640s, and they were badly damaged.

Scarborough's history as a spa town began when a spring was discovered in 1626, and more visitors came after it was publicised by Dr Wittie's book in 1660. The Scarborough to York railway (1845) meant further popularity.

Scarborough is associated with Alan Ayckbourn, and almost all his plays receive their first performance at the Stephen Joseph theatre.

The Rotunda museum is a national centre for geology - appropriate, as Scarborough is on Yorkshire's Jurassic Coast.

Bridlington harbour Whitby harbourRobin Hood's Bay

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