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Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018, Beverley to Doncaster

Beverley Market Place

Beverley Market Place, by Hedgehog Cycling

Stage 1, men's Tour de Yorkshire 2018: race report

Harry Tanfield wins Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018

Harry Tanfield wins Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018, by SWPix

Harry Tanfield (Canyon-Eisberg) won Stage 1 of the Tour de Yorkshire 2018 from a breakaway.

Ian Stannard (Team Sky) was prominent at the front of the bunch, trying to bring back the break, together with Dimension Data and Sunweb. However, the peloton mis-timed its acceleration, and left the five riders up front to fight it out for the win.

Yorkshireman Tanfield, from Great Ayton, was first to the line. He said, 'Everyone was gassed and it was a bit of a headwind. I just went straight up the middle and had time to get my hands in the air, so I can't complain.'

Sir Gary Verity said, 'What a performance that was. Harry has beaten some of the biggest and best names in the sport today, and this is going to be a victory he remembers for the rest of his life. The day will live long in my memory as well.'

Stage 1, women's Tour de Yorkshire 2018: race report

Kirsten Wild wins Stage 1 Tour de Yorkshire 2018

Kirsten Wild wins women's Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018, by SWPix

Kirsten Wild (Wiggle-High5) won Stage 1 of the women's Tour de Yorkshire 2018 in a bunch sprint in Doncaster. She beat Amalie Diderikson (Boels-Dolmans) and Alice Barnes (Canyon-SRAM). Wild's 10 second time bonus puts here in the overall race lead.

Dani Rowe (Great Britain Cycling Team) took three bonus seconds by winning the intermediate sprint in Pocklington, and one bonus second by taking third place at the sprint in Howden. She is in fourth place overall, and may ride well up the Cow & Calf tomorrow.

17-year-old Georgi Pfeiffer (Jadan-Weldtite Vive le Vélo) won the only categorised climb, the Côte de Baggaby Hill, and is therefore in the Queen of the Mountains jersey.

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: route overview

Stage 1 of the 2018 Tour de Yorkshire is 182km from Beverley to Doncaster. There's a 16km loop via Hornsea at the start, with the riders coming back to Beverley, then heading for the Yorkshire Wolds. The intermediate sprints are at Pocklington and Howden, and it's likely to be a sprint finish in Doncaster.

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: map

Welcome to Yorkshire has an interactive map of Stage 1.

Map of Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018

Map of Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018, courtesy of Welcome to Yorkshire

Profile of Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018

Profile of Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018, © Welcome to Yorkshire/race organisers

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: women's race

Welcome to Yorkshire has an interactive map of the women's Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018.

The women's Stage 1 is a slightly shorter version of the same route from Beverley to Doncaster. It simply misses out the initial loop to Hornsea and back, but otherwise the route is the same, with the same climb, sprints, and finish. The route distance is 132.5km as opposed to 182km for the men's route.

Women's Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018 map

Map of women's Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018, courtesy of Welcome to Yorkshire

Profile of women's Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018

Profile of women's Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018, © Welcome to Yorkshire/race organisers

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: timings

The women's race starts in Beverley at 0840 (ceremonial start), and the flag goes down for the start of the racing at 0850. There are three estimated average speeds (40kmh, 38kmh, and 36kmh). The riders will arrive at the finish line in Doncaster between 1208 and 1230. See the full timings of the women's Tour de Yorkshire 2018 Stage 1.

The men's race starts in Beverley at 1105 (ceremonial start), and the flag goes down and the racing starts at 1115. The three estimated average speeds are 44kmh, 42kmh, and 40kmh. The riders arrive at the finish line in Doncaster between 1808 and 1833. See the full timings of the men's Tour de Yorkshire 2018 Stage 1.

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: video preview

Welcome to Yorkshire has published a video preview of the Stage 1 route, with Madison Genesis riders Connor Swift and Tobyn Horton:

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: the route

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: the start at Beverley

Beverley Minster

Beverley Minster, by Hedgehog Cycling

Stage 1 begins at Beverley Market Place (ceremonial start). East Riding council have a Tour de Yorkshire 2018 Plan Your Day page. They say there's entertainment in Beverley, to warm up the crowd. It's suggested that people use the Park & Ride at Beverley racecourse, and get to the town centre in good time to see the women's race off at 0840.

The riders leave Beverley heading east north east on the A1174 Hull Bridge Road, then the A1035. Just after crossing the river Hull, the flag goes down and the racing starts.

Stage 1 continues on the A1035 past Hornsea Mere to Hornsea. Here, it does a loop south (on Hull Road/Hornsea Road) to Great Hatfield and Little Hatfield, then travels via Great Hatfield Road back to the A1035, and on back to Beverley Market Place - a second chance for spectators in Beverley to see the race.

Hornsea promenade

Hornsea, by grassrootsgroundswell, Licence CC BY 2.0

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Beverley to Howden

Howden Minster

Howden Minster, by Gordon Kneale Brook, Licence CC BY-SA 2.0

Leaving Beverley again, this time going south on the A164, the riders then turn off to Skidby and Little Weighton. Next, they make their way north to Walkington, Cherry Burton, Etton, Lund, Middleton-on-the-Wolds, and North Dalton.

From North Dalton, it's west on the B1246, and the next village is Warter. This is where the only categorised climb of the stage begins - the Côte de Baggaby Hill. Then it's downhill to Pocklington and the first intermediate sprint.

Pocklington

Pocklington, by Keith Laverack, Flickr, Licence CC BY-ND 2.0

The route continues south from Pocklington via Allerthorpe (past Allerthorpe Lakeland Park fishing and water sports lake) and Seaton Ross (home to an RAF bomber base during World War II) to Holme-on-Spalding-Moor.

Beyond Holme-on-Spalding-Moor, the peloton takes the A614 south south west to Howden, where the second and final intermediate sprint takes place.

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Howden to Doncaster

Doncaster Corn Exchange

Corn Exchange Doncaster, by John Lord, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

Shortly after Howden, the race crosses the river Ouse, and continues to Rawcliffe on the river Aire. These are flat lands which, in centuries past, were fens, before being drained. Staying on the A614, the riders go under the M62, then they turn off on Between Rivers Lane, now in South Yorkshire, heading for Fishlake, Stainforth (which is home to Doncaster Greyhound Stadium), and Hatfield. (This was a coal-mining area, and between Stainforth and Hatfield was Hatfield Main Colliery, open from 1916 to 2001, then again from 2007 to 2015. The film Brassed Off used Hatfield Colliery as a location for filming).

Robin Hood airport

Robin Hood Airport, Doncaster, by Ben Sutherland, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

From Hatfield, the route is via the A18 then A614 Bawtry Road to Hatfield Woodhouse and Blaxton. Then the riders head west on the B1396 to Auckley, before taking Hurst Lane south (past Doncaster Airport) to meet the A638.

Now all that's left is a fast run-in to Doncaster, most of it on the A638. At the junction with the A18, the riders are close to Doncaster Racecourse.

Doncaster Racecourse

Doncaster Racecourse, by Helena, Licence CC BY-SA 2.0

They go straight on at the roundabout, on Bennetthorpe. The finish line is on Bennetthorpe.

Doncaster Council has a spectator guide. They say that there's to be a fan zone on the Town Field from 10.30am to 7pm. It will feature Café Doncaster, Yorkshire's largest cycle café, plus live music, entertainment, and a big screen showing the cycling live.

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Tour de Yorkshire 2018

Beverley market place

All the news from the 2018 Tour de Yorkshire, and the routes of the four stages.

Read about the Tour de Yorkshire 2018.

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: towns & places of interest on the route

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Beverley

Beverley Minster

Beverley Minster, by Hedgehog Cycling

Beverley is a market town, and the county town of the East Riding of Yorkshire. It has a population of 30,587 people (2011 census). 

History

Beverley was founded around 700AD by St John of Beverley, who was Bishop Of York, and who built a church and founded a monastery here. At the time it was called Inderawuda (in the wood of the men of Deira), but its name was changed to Bevreli (beaver lake). In Anglo-Saxon times, Beverley became one of the most important Christian centres in northern England.

After the Norman conquest, many pilgrims visited Beverley, inspired by stories of miracles associated with John of Beverley. Beverley was also a trading town, selling wool to cloth makers in the Low Countries. By 1377, it was the tenth largest town in England.

Thereafter, Beverley declined gently, albeit it was still the main market town for the surrounding area. While Hull was bombed during World War II, Beverley escaped largely unscathed.

Some of the historic entrances to the town, such as the brick-built bars, were taken down due to an increase in population, but the North Bar remains.

Beverley North Bar

North Bar, Beverley, by Hedgehog Cycling

Beverley today

Beverley has the oldest state school in England, Beverley Grammar School, which was founded by John of Beverley in 700AD. Thomas Percy, who was involved in the gunpowder plot, went there, as did goalie Paul Robinson.

As well as the Minster, which has a tomb containing the bones of John of Beverley, there are two other C of E churches, St Mary's and St Nicholas.

St Mary's church, Beverley

St Mary's church, Beverley, by Hedgehog Cyling

There's also a Roman Catholic church, three Methodist churches, and a Quaker meeting house.

Beverley market place

Beverley Market Place, by Hedgehog Cycling

The main market day is Saturday, with a smaller market on Wednesdays. There are plenty of cafés in Beverley, and many (over 40) pubs.

Cafe Velo, Beverley  

Beverley has a well-known racecourse to the west of the town centre.

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Hornsea

Hornsea

Hornsea, by David Wright, Licence CC BY 2.0

Hornsea is a small seaside resort, with redbrick buildings, and caravan sites to the north and south of the town. Hornsea has a promenade, formal gardens, hotels, and fish and chip shops.

It expanded in the Victorian era with the building of the Hull and Hornsea Railway (open 1864 to 1964). The trackbed is now used by the Hornsea Rail Trail foot and cycle path, which is part of the Trans Pennine Trail.

Hornsea Pottery was open from 1950 to 2000. There's now a shopping centre called Hornsea Freeport near the Pottery site.

Hornsea Mere is the last of many lakes which existed in this area. The others were all drained by the late 1800s.

There is considerable coastal erosion at Hornsea.

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Cherry Burton

Cherry Burton is a village of 1,392 people, which has a shop, a pub (the Bay Horse), and a village hall; it is a Fairtrade Village.

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Etton

Etton is a village of 277 people, where Reverend John Lothropp was born in 1584 - he went on to found Barnstable, Massachusetts. Thomas Carling emigrated from Etton to Canada in 1818, and used a recipe from his native Yorkshire for the beer he made in the Carling Brewery. Probably Carling is served in the local pub, the Light Dragoon.

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2017: Pocklington

Pocklington

Pocklington, by Keith Laverack, Flickr, Licence CC BY-ND 2.0

Pocklington is a small market town in the Yorkshire Wolds, dominated by the C15th tower of All Saints' church.

In the Middle Ages, Pocklington was a local centre for trading wool. These days, it is home to many commuters to York.

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Holme-on-Spalding-Moor

Holme-on-Spalding-Moor - the name of the village, Holme, is Danish in origin, and means 'island', and that's because the village was built on a hill in the marsh that was Spalding Moor.

There was an RAF station here during and after World War II. The USAF occupied it for three years from 1954 to 1957, then it was in private hands until the last tenant, British Aerospace, moved out in 1984.

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Howden

Howden Minster

Howden Minster, by David Locke, Licence CC BY 2.0

Howden is a small market town near Goole.

It was given to the Bishop of Durham by William the Conqueror in 1080. The Bishop gave Howden's church to the monks of Durham.

The church was replaced with a Minster, built from 1228 until sometime in the 1400s. It had fallen to ruins by the mid-1700s, but renovations were undertaken in the C20th, and completed in 1932. It has choir stalls by Mousy Thompson.

During World War I, there was an airship station at Howden (RNAS Howden), with airship hangars for airships which provided protection to the east coast from U-boats.

Businesses in Howden include the Press Association, ebuyer.com, and Wren Kitchens.

Stage 1, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Doncaster

Doncaster Corn Exchange

Corn Exchange Doncaster, by John Lord, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

Doncaster is a market town on the river Don, with a population of 109,805 (2011 census).

It grew up around a Roman fort called Danum, built in the C1st AD on the river Don (the site of St George's Minster today). The fort was on a Roman route from Lincoln to York.

Doncaster's charter for a market was granted in 1248. More recently, its population expanded due to coal mining in the area. Coal mining has declined, but Doncaster remains a distribution centre, due to its good transport links. Other industries include glass, and wire rope, manufacture.

Amongst the attractions in Doncaster today are Doncaster Museum & Art Gallery, The Dome sports & leisure centre, Cusworth Hall & Country Park, and shopping at Doncaster Market and Frenchgate. The local football team is Doncaster Rovers, and there's a rugby league side, Doncaster RLFC.

Doncaster Market

Doncaster Markets, by The Trust Doncaster Central Development Trust, Flickr, Licence CC BY-SA 2.0

Beverley Market Place HornseaDoncaster

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