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Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018, Barnsley to Ilkley

Cow & Calf pub, Ilkley

Cow & Calf pub, Ilkley, by Hedgehog Cycling

Stage 2, men's Tour de Yorkshire 2018: race report

Magnus Cort Nielsen

Magnus Cort Nielsen, by SWPix

The men's Stage finished on the same climb to the Cow & Calf as the women's race, and Magnus Cort Nielsen (Astana) won, beating Greg van Avermaet into second place.

The day's break involved four riders, and Stephane Rossetto (Cofidis) was the last to be caught. Serge Pauwels (Dimension Data) was prominent on the final climb, but he was overtaken by Greg van Avermaet. However, it was Cort Nielsen who timed his surge well, and who takes the overall lead, 4s ahead of van Avermaet.

Stage 2, women's Tour de Yorkshire 2018: race report

Guarnier wins Stage 2, women's Tour de Yorkshire 2018

Megan Guarnier (Boels Dolmans) won Stage 2 of the women's Tour de Yorkshire 2018, and took the overall race win too. Alena Amialiusik (Canyon SRAM) was second, and Dani Rowe (Great Britain Cycling Team) was third. On GC, Rowe was second and Amialiusik third.

Guarnier took flight on the final climb at the Cow & Calf. She said, 'It's a real honour to win this race, and it's my first victory of the year, so I'm excited. I have never, ever seen so many people on a finishing climb, and so many people cheering us on. That really helped bring me home, because I was full gas at the end.'

Sir Gary Verity said, 'You only had to listen to the world's best riders talking after the race, to hear how bowled over they had been by the reception. It truly has been on an unprecedented scale. The peloton was given a great send-off in Barnsley, and people lined the entire route as they wound their way to Ilkley for that spectacular finish. We knew the Cow and Calf would provide a magnificent conclusion, and we weren't disappointed. Megan produced a stunning ride, and is a more than worthy winner.'

Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: route overview

Stage 2 of the 2018 Tour de Yorkshire is 149km from Barnsley to Ilkley. It begins with an anti-clockwise loop to Penistone, then after Worsbrough comes the first categorised climb, the Côte de Blacker Hill. The first intermediate sprint is at Swinton. Soon after, the riders reach Conisbrough, then the route is north via Pontefract and Castleford to the second sprint at Scholes. The riders go past Harewood House, and a little further on the second climb is of Old Pool Bank. Then it's on via Otley to Ilkley. There's a summit finish at the Cow & Calf above Ilkley - the first summit finish on any Tour de Yorkshire so far.

Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: map

There's an interactive map of Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018.

Map of Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018

Map of Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018, courtesy of Welcome to Yorkshire

Profile of Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018

Profile of Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018, © Welcome to Yorkshire/race organisers

Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: women's race

There's an interactive map of the Women's Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018.

The women's Stage 2 is a slightly shorter version of the same route from Barnsley to Ilkley. It misses out the initial loop to Penistone, and comes in at 124km instead of 149km for the men. It includes the same sprints and climbs as the men's race, including the summit finish at the Cow & Calf, where Sir Gary Verity expects the culmination to be electric.

Map of women's Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018

Map of women's Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018, courtesy of Welcome to Yorkshire

Profile of women's Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018

Profile of women's Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018, © Welcome to Yorkshire/race organisers

Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: timings

The women's Stage 2 starts at 0900 in Barnsley (ceremonial start), with the flag going down for the racing to start at 0905. The estimated average speeds are 39kmh, 37kmh, and 35kmh, and depending  on which is the closest, the finish at the Cow & Calf above Ilkley will be between 1221 and 1244. See the full timings for the women's Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018.

The men's Stage 2 begins at 1420 (ceremonial start). The racing starts at 1430. The estimated average speeds of 45kmh, 43kmh, and 41kmh mean an arrival time at the Cow & Calf finish line between 1748 and 1807. See the full timings for the men's Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018.

Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: the route

Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: the start at Barnsley

Barnsley Town Hall

Barnsley Town Hall, public domain

Stage 2 begins by Barnsley Town Hall (ceremonial start). The men's and women's races both set off from Church Street, and go on to St Mary's Place and Church Lane, before diverging at the A635. The women turn right on the A635 Old Mill Lane, while the men take the A635 Huddersfield Road. Barnsley MBC has a detailed map of the route within Barnsley.

The council has Tour de Yorkshire 2018 in Barnsley information on its website. The camp and warm-up area for the teams is in the Court House car park on County Way. There are to be Fanzones in Mandela Gardens (music stage and stalls), as well as at the Town Hall, and The Core car park. A big screen will show the races live at the fountains in Barnsley Pals Centenary Square, Lancaster Street. The riders will sign on in Town Hall Gardens.

The route description that follows includes the initial loop which makes the men's race longer.

The riders leave Barnsley heading west on the A635. The flag goes down and the racing starts at Barugh Green. The first part of the race route is via Cawthorne and Silkstone, then on the A628 to Penistone. The riders then come back east on the B6462 Sheffield Road alongside the river Don to Thurgoland.

After going through Hood Green and Worsbrough, the peloton takes Station Road/Wentworth Road up Blacker Hill. This is the first categorised climb on Stage 2, the Côte de Blacker Hill.

Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Barnsley to Castleford

Castleford

Allinson's Mill, Castleford, by Tim Green, Licence CC BY 2.0

After the top of Blacker Hill, the riders continue south to Hoyland and Wentworth (close to Wentworth Castle, a stately home built in the 1700s which was the home of the Earls of Strafford, and gardens).

Wentworth Castle

Wentworth Castle, by Phil Bartle, Licence CC BY 2.0

They then head east on the B6090 to an intermediate sprint at Swinton (known in the past for ceramics, particularly Rockingham Pottery).

After the sprint, the route crosses the river Don, then meets the A630 near Hooton Roberts. The A630 takes Stage 2 to Conisbrough.

Conisbrough Castle

Conisbrough Castle, by Lee Firth, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

From Conisbrough, the riders take Doncaster Road past Denaby Main (originally Denaby Main Colliery Village, housing for coal mine workers at Denaby Main Colliery which closed in 1968), and over the river Don to Mexborough. From Mexborough, they are on Adwick Road to Adwick-upon-Dearne.

Hooton Pagnell

Hooton Pagnell, classic view, by Lee Firth, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

After Adwick-upon-Dearne, Stage 2 heads north on minor roads to Barnburgh, Hooton Pagnell, and South Elmsall. Then the race is on the A638/A628 to Ackworth, where Tour de Yorkshire-related decorations are being put up. There'll be blue and yellow bunting, and twenty yellow bikes, as well as wooden bikes made by a local resident. At Carr Bridge playing fields, there's to be a big screen showing the race, refreshments, ice cream van, and face painting. For the riders, no time to get their faces painted - it's on to Pontefract then Castleford.

Pontefract Castle

Pontefract Castle 2, by Tim Green, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Castleford to Ilkley

Ilkley

Ilkley from Ilkley Moor, by Hedgehog Cycling

From Castleford, the Stage 2 route is north on the A656, then B6137 to Kippax. The riders continue to Garforth. (Kippax and Garforth are both former mining villages, which are within the City of Leeds Metropolitan Borough). Further north on the route is Barwick-in-Elmet, then Scholes for the second intermediate sprint.

The Gascoigne Arms, Barwick-in-Elmet

Gascoigne Arms, Barwick-in-Elmet, by Tim Green, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

Then it's on to Thorner and East Keswick, before joining the A659 to Harewood. There's a short, sharp (uncategorised) climb up the A61 to pass the main entrance of Harewood House.

Harewood House

Harewood House, by Hedgehog Cycling

A little further on, the riders turn onto Weeton Lane, which takes them to the A658, in turn leading to Pool-in-Wharfedale.

Half Moon, Pool

Half Moon Inn, Pool-in-Wharfedale, by Tim Green, Licence CC BY 2.0

Instead of taking the main road up Pool Bank, Stage 2 tackles Old Pool Bank, which is a categorised climb. At the top, the riders join the A660 to Otley.

Otley market place

Otley market place, by Hedgehog Cycling

They cross the river Wharfe in Otley, and take Weston Lane via Askwith, to join the A65 on the edge of Ilkley.

Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: summit finish at the Cow & Calf

Cow & Calf, Ilkley

Cow & Calf, Ilkley, by Tim Green, Licence CC BY 2.0

After going along the A65 (the main road in Ilkley), the riders turn up towards the Cow & Calf, taking Brook Street, Cowpasture Road, and Hangingstone Road.

Sign to Cow & Calf from Ilkley

Sign to Cow & Calf in Ilkley, by Hedgehog Cycling

It's a steep climb, and a very well-known beauty spot. Add to that Ilkley's enthusiasm for cycling - Ilkley Cycling Club is the largest in the UK, with over 1,000 members - and it should make for a noisy, thronged, and thoroughly enjoyable finish to the stage.

The women's race is likely to end here about 12.30, and the men's race at 6pm.

Ben Swift

Ben Swift, by SWPix

Ben Swift, who will be riding for the Great Britain Cycling Team, is from Rotherham, so he has trained on the roads of Yorkshire. He is looking forward to massive crowds, and particularly to the Côte de Cow & Calf. 'I've ridden the Cow & Calf on training rides before, and while it's not the longest climb, the steep gradient will mean a fair few riders should be dropped before the finish of Stage 2.'

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Tour de Yorkshire 2018

Beverley market place

All the news from the 2018 Tour de Yorkshire, and the routes of the four stages.

Read about the Tour de Yorkshire 2018.

Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: towns & places of interest on the route

Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Barnsley

Barnsley Town Hall & Sculpture

Barnsley Town Hall & Sculpture, public domain

Barnsley is a large town to the north of Sheffield, near the valley of the river Dearne. The population is around 91,000.

The origin of the name Barnsley is uncertain, but it could come from the Saxon for barn and field ('lay'). The first settlement here was built by the monks of Pontefract Priory.

The traditional industry in Barnsley was linen (1700s and 1800s), then later coal-mining and glass-making. The HQ of the National Union of Mineworkers is still in Barnsley, although all the collieries in the area have closed. The first bottle bank for collecting glass for recycling in the UK was in Barnsley - put in place in 1977.

Today, cake makers Premier Foods are based in Barnsley, as are online retailer ASOS.

Brass bands associated with collieries are still kept going in and around Barnsley. The Arctic Monkeys studied music at Barnsley College.

Barnsley FC play at Oakwell Stadium.

Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Conisbrough

Conisbrough Castle

Conisbrough Castle, by Lee Firth, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

Conisbrough is a town on the river Don, with a population of 15,934 (2011 census). The name comes from the Old English Cyningesburh, meaning king's stronghold. 

Conisbrough was important in Anglo-Saxon and Viking times. The church which stands there today, St Peter's, is probably Anglo-Saxon, from the C8th. Conisbrough belonged to King Harold before 1066. After the Norman Conquest, William I gave it to William de Warenne.

Conisbrough Castle is from the time after the Norman Conquest. The keep was built in the 1170s or 1180s under de Warenne, and other parts date from the 1200s. It was abandoned from the late 1400s or early 1500s, and fell into disrepair.

Famous people from Conisbrough include footballer Alan Sunderland, and singer Tony Christie. If you're from Conisbrough, it's a long way to Amarillo, so it's no wonder if you have to ask directions.

Conisbrough viaduct

Conisbrough Viaduct, by David Locke, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Hooton Pagnell

Hooton Pagnell

Hooton Pagnell, classic view, by Lee Firth, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

The name Hooton Pagnell comes from hotone (town on the hill), and Paganel (the name of tenant-in-chief Ralph de Paganel, shortly after the Norman Conquest).

Much of the property in the village belongs to the estate of Hooton Pagnell Hall, which has been in the Warde family since Sir Patience Warde bought it in 1703. (With a name like that, it's no surprise that he was prepared to wait a long time without re-selling).

Hooton Pagnell gatehouse and church

Hooton Pagnell, gatehouse and church, by Lee Firth, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: North and South Elmsall

Frickley Athletic

The Frank Hill Stand, by Matthew Wilkinson, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

The name Elmsall comes from Old English, with elm meaning elm tree, and halh referring to a nook of land or small valley. Elmsall is referred to in the Domesday Book.

The most significant landmark in North Elmsall is St Margaret's church, dating from 1896.

South Elmsall is a town of about 6,000 people. Originally an agricultural settlement, it was then the site of Frickley Colliery, one of the largest deep coal mines in Britain. The miners here strongly supported the NUM strike of 1984-5, and were amongst the last to return to work. The Colliery closed in 1993, and the site is now Frickley Country Park.

Today, the Dale Lane Industrial Estate has warehouses for companies including Next Distribution.

South Elmsall is home to Carlton Main Frickley Colliery Band, Frickley Athletic football club, and Elmsall Road Club, a cycling club.

Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Ackworth

Ackworth School clock

Ackworth School clock, by Tim Green, Licence CC BY 2.0

Ackworth is a village in four parts - High Ackworth, Low Ackworth, Ackworth Moor Top, and Brackenhill. The name might mean 'enclosure of oaks'.

Ackworth independent Quaker school was founded by John Fothergill in 1779.

Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Pontefract

Pontefract Town Hall

Pontefract Town Hall, by Tim Green, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

Pontefract is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Wakefield. The population of Pontefract is 29,305 (2011 census). Its motto is post mortem patris pro filio, which is a reference to the town's Royalist sympathies during the English Civil War.

The name Pontefract means 'broken bridge', and refers to an incident in 1069, when William the Conqueror was on his way through Yorkshire to put down an uprising, and found that the bridge over the Aire at Pontefract had been broken by local Anglo-Scandinavians.

Legendary figure Robin Hood is said to have been active in the nearby forest of Barnsdale in the C12th, and at the village of Wentbridge near Pontefract. In some versions of his story, he died at Kirby (Pontefract).

History of Pontefract

Pontefract is on an old Roman road, described as 'Roman Ridge', which was an alternative to the main route from Doncaster to York.

In the Anglo-Scandinavian age (between the fall of Viking Erik Bloodaxe in 954, and the arrival of the Normans in 1068), Pontefract consisted of two settlements, Tanshelf and Kirby. 

Pontefract Castle

Pontefract Castle 2, by Tim Green, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

Pontefract Castle was built following the Norman conquest, under Ilbert de Lacy, one of William's followers. It was a wooden motte and bailey construction at first, then rebuilt in stone. The de Lacy family lived there until 1348.

Kind Richard II was murdered in Pontefract Castle in 1400. Shakespeare, referring to Pontefract as Pomfret, in Richard III, wrote:

Pomfret, Pomfret! O thou bloody prison

Fatal and ominous to noble peers!

Within the guilty closure of thy walls

Richard the second here was hack'd to death;

And, for more slander to thy dismal seat, 

We give thee up our guiltless blood to drink.

Pontefract Castle was beseiged by Oliver Cromwell and the Parliamentarians three times, 1648-9, during the English Civil War. After the third seige, the local people petitioned Parliament for the castle to be 'slighted', and demolition began in April 1649.

Pontefract today

Pontefract has been a market town since the Middle Ages. Locals can come to 'Ponte' market on Wednesdays and Saturdays. (The town is called Ponte, and some people jokingly refer to it as Ponte Carlo).

Pontefract has a sandy soil, good for growing liquorice. The plant is no longer grown here, but liquorice sweets are still made, including Pontefract Cakes.

Liquorice-related artefacts are amongst those on display at Pontefract Museum.

Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Castleford

Castleford

Allinson's Mill, Castleford, by Tim Green, Licence CC BY 2.0

Castleford is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Wakefield, with a population of about 40,000. It's at the confluence of the river Calder and the river Aire, and on the Aire & Calder Navigation.

This is where the Roman military camp of Lagentium was situated.

Castleford expanded rapidly in the C19th due to coal-mining in the area, but the collieries closed towards the end of the C20th.

The Xscape leisure complex which includes an indoor ski slope is in Castleford. The Castleford Tigers rugby league team represent the town. Just north east of Castleford is RSPB Fairburn Ings.

Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Barwick-in-Elmet

The Gascoigne Arms, Barwick-in-Elmet

Gascoigne Arms, Barwick-in-Elmet, by Tim Green, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

Barwick-in-Elmet is explicitly associated with the ancient Celtic kingdom of Elmet. The name 'Barwick' comes from the Old English 'barley wick'.

Barwick-in-Elmet existed as long ago as 600-200BC, and it has an Iron Age fort in the centre of the village, later used by the Normans to make a motte and bailey castle. In World War II, it served as an observation post.

Historically, this was an agricultural community, but from the late C17th, many residents were employed in mining at Garforth, Cross Gates, and Whitkirk. Today, many people commute to office jobs in Leeds or York.

Barwick-in-Elmet has an 86-foot wooden maypole at the junction of Main Street and The Cross. Every three years, a maypole festival on Spring Bank Holiday (in May) brings large crowds. There's a procession, dancing, a street market, and the raising of the maypole ceremony, when a villager climbs the maypole and spins 'the fox' (the weather vane at the top).

Barwick has three pubs, a fish and chip shop, a bike shop, and two churches.

Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Scholes

The names Scholes comes from the plural of the Old Norse skali, meaning 'temporary shed'. Scholes has a population of 2,266 (2011 Census). From the 1880s to the 1980s, the Scholes Brick and Tile Works produced high-quality bricks, from which many of the local houses are built. The Works' quarry is now two small fishing lakes, but is still known as 'Chippy's Quarry', after Isaac Chippindale, who started the business.

Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Thorner

St Peter's church, Thorner

St Peter, Thorner, by Tim Green, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

Thorner has a population of 1,408 (2011 Census). It appears in the Domesday Book as Torneure, meaning thorn bank. Thorner has two pubs - the Mexborough Arms, and the Fox - as well as a bar/restaurant called The Beehive.

St Peter's church, Thorner, is in the late English Gothic style.

The route of a dismantled railway runs through Thorner via Scholes to Cross Gates in the east of Leeds, and it could be turned into a cycling, walking, and riding route, which would be called the Penda Greenway.

Stage 2, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Harewood House

Harewood House

Harewood House is a graceful stately home, standing within charming grounds. 

It was built in the mid-1700s, for Edwin Lascelles. The building was done by John Carr of York, with interiors by Robert Adam, furnishings by Thomas Chippendale, and the garden by Capability Brown. 

Inside the house, you can visit State Rooms, bedrooms, and the library; there's also a Below Stairs section, that includes the Old Kitchen. One of the house's treasures is Chippendale's State Bed.

There's an impressive art collection, with watercolours painted by JMW Turner when he visited Harewood House aged 22. There are also family portraits by Reynolds, and temporary exhibitions under the name Harewood Contemporary. 

The gardens are extensive, and include a popular Bird Garden, with penguins, and an Adventure Playground. 

The ruins of Harewood Castle, begun in 1366 when Sir William de Aldeburgh was given a licence to crenellate (!), may open to the public when they are made sufficiently safe. 

Emmerdale has its own set in the grounds of Harewood House.

Emmerdale

Barnsley Town Hall Harewood HouseCow & Calf Ilkley

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