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Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018, Richmond to Scarborough

Scarborough South Bay

Scarborough South Bay, by Hedgehog Cycling

Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: race report

Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018 crowds

Stage 3 Tour de Yorkshire 2018 crowds, by SWPix

Maximillian Walscheid (Team Sunweb) won Stage 3 of the 2018 Tour de Yorkshire in Scarborough, ahead of Magnus Cort Nielsen (Astana) who retains the overall race lead.

Sir Gary Verity said, 'Once again the number of roadside spectators [650,000] was utterly unbelievable. I don't think Richmond has ever seen so many people, and every village and town along the route was packed with smiling faces. Scarborough did itself proud as well. We love the finish on the North Bay, and it's an iconic feature of the Tour de Yorkshire. The crowds are always massive there, but this year they were larger than ever, and we were treated to some great racing in brilliant sunshine.'

Winner Walscheid said, 'The reception we got all day was fantastic - people were standing in many rows. I've ridden famous races like Paris-Roubaix before, but never seen crowds like that. This win was one of the proudest moments of my career.'

Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: route overview

Stage 3 of the 2018 Tour de Yorkshire is 184km from Richmond to Scarborough. The racing starts at Catterick Garrison, then the riders head south to Leyburn, before going east to Bedale, and crossing the A1 near Leeming Bar. The first intermediate sprint is at Morton-on-Swale, then it's on to Northallerton and Thirsk, before the first categorised climb, the Côte de Sutton Bank. Now the race is in the North York Moors, and it goes through Hambleton, Helmsley, Beadlam, and Kirkbymoorside, and continues east to Pickering for the second intermediate sprint.

Nearing the coast, Stage 3 tackles the categorised climb of Côte de Silpho, then it's on to Scalby, and Scarborough for the first time. The riders go down the coast to Filey, then back up via Cayton and Irton to Scarborough for the traditional finish at North Bay.

Grosmont railway station

North York Moors railway, by James West, Flickr, Licence CC BY-SA 2.0

You could look at this as the stage of two heritage railways. The first, in the west, is the Wensleydale railway, and Stage 3 follows its route between Leyburn and Leeming Bar. The second, in the east, is the North York Moors railway - at Pickering, Stage 3 passes the southern end of this line which runs north to Whitby.

Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: map

Welcome to Yorkshire has an interactive map of Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018.

Map of Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018

Map of Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018, courtesy of Welcome to Yorkshire

Profile of Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018

Profile of Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018, © Welcome to Yorkshire/race organisers

Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: timings

Stage 3 begins in Richmond at 1310 (ceremonial start). The flag goes down and the racing starts at 1320. The estimated average speeds are 44kmh, 42kmh, and 40kmh, and depending on which is the most accurate on the day, the riders will arrive at the finish line in Scarborough between 1726 and 1751. See the full timings for Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018.

Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: the route

Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: the start at Richmond

Richmond

Richmond, by Paul Arps, Licence CC BY 2.0

Stage 3 begins in Richmond (ceremonial start). Richmondshire Today says there's to be a community area in the market place in front of the King's Head and Green Howards Museum, where Minster FM will be broadcasting live from a stage throughout the afternoon. Stalls will sell refreshments. A big screen in front of Boots will show live race coverage. More events are mentioned in the Northern Echo, including children's activities in Richmond Friary gardens, and the Yorkshire Regiment Band marching from the start line at 12.25. In the evening, bands are lined up to play on the stage.

The riders leave Richmond heading south to Catterick Garrison, where the racing starts. (Entertainment, refreshments, competitions and cycling events will take place in Coronation Park; there'll be a big screen at Phoenix House in Catterick, and a BBQ for veterans and their families). The peloton turns right on Leyburn Road, then left on Range Road, towards Barden Moor.

Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Richmond to Kirkbymoorside

Kirkbymoorside

Kirkbymoorside, by Gareth, Licence CC BY 2.0

Stage 3 takes the A6108 to Leyburn, where there'll be a big screen showing the race, a stage with entertainment, fairground rides, and refreshment stalls.

Leyburn, Bolton Arms

Bolton Arms, Leyburn, by Hedgehog Cycling

From Leyburn, it's east on the A684 through Constable Burton (called Constable because it was given to the Earl of Richmond's Chief Constable in 1100), Akebar, Patrick Brompton (meaning enclosed land where the shrub broom grows, belonging to someone called Patrick; blue & yellow bunting, and knitted Tour de Yorkshire jerseys, will be hanging up on the day), and Little Crakehall ('crake' referring to a crow or raven; there'll be a big screen in Crakehall). Stage 3 then arrives in Bedale. Bedale will have a big screen in the centre, a band performing on a stage, a BBQ, bunting and decorations, and pieces of Land Art produced by pupils of Bedale High School.

Bedale

Bedale, by Mick Knapton, Licence CC BY-SA 3.0

The riders leave Bedale via Aiskew, and cross the A1 to Leeming Bar (which was on the original Great North Road, Roman Dere Street; the word 'bar' refers to the fact that there was a toll station here, removed in 1840. There's a station at Leeming Bar, that is the main depot of the Wensleydale railway).

Wensleydale Railway

Wensleydale Railway, by Lobsan, Licence CC BY-SA 3.0

From Leeming Bar, the route is on the A684 over the river Swale to Morton-on-Swale (just short of Ainderby Steeple). The first intermediate sprint is at Morton-on-Swale.

Northallerton High Street

Northallerton High Street, by James West, Flickr, Licence CC BY-SA 2.0

Beyond Ainderby Steeple, there's a left turn on Dolly Lane to Yafforth. The peloton approaches Northallerton on the B6271, then the route is down Northallerton High Street, and out of Northallerton on the A168 Thirsk Road. Northallerton is to display two pieces of Land Art, one opposite County Hall (cartoon figures celebrating the Tour de Yorkshire coming through the town), and the other at the Old Prison site (a Welcome to Northallerton slogan, and a polka-dot jersey).

The riders pass through Thornton-le-Street (meaning thorn tree farm on a Roman road) on the way to Thirsk. Thirsk will boast a big screen, a vintage bus in the centre of town, yarn-bombing decoration of the town centre, and street entertainers.

Thirsk

Thirsk, DSC_1525, by Paul Massey, Flickr, Licence CC BY-ND 2.0

Stage 3 leaves Thirsk on the A170, heading for Sutton-under-Whitestonecliffe - the longest hyphenated place-name in England - and Sutton Bank. The Côte de Sutton Bank is the first of two categorised climbs on this stage. The maximum gradient is 25%, and it has one hairpin bend, just 20 fewer than Alpe-d'Huez.

Sutton Bank and Gormire Lake

Sutton Bank Gormire Lake, by Allan Harris, Flickr, Licence CC BY-ND 2.0

At Sutton Bank, there's to be a big screen, live music, kids' time trials on a mountain bike skills area, and a beer tent with ales from Helmsley Brewing Co.

Now, the riders are in the North York Moors. They take the A170 through the Hambleton Hills to Helmsley.

Helmsley Castle

Helmsley Castle, by Nick Wise, Flickr, Licence CC BY-ND 2.0

From Helmsley, the race continues east through the North York Moors. It stays on the A170, crossing the little river Riccal near Beadlam Roman villa, and continuing to the contiguous villages of Beadlam and Nawton. (Nawton is known for the gardens of Nawton Tower, created in the 1700s by Sir John Vanbrugh).

A little further on the A170, Stage 3 reaches the riders' feed station at Kirkbymoorside. Kirkbymoorside is planning a vintage charity tractor run, and an 'evolution of Kirkbymoorside man' piece of Land Art - from ape to homo erectus, to running man, to cycling man, and finally to tractor man. I'm not 100% sure that 'tractors are better than bikes' quite hits the right note, but maybe I'm being too literal.

Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Kirkbymoorside to Scarborough

North Bay, Scarborough

North Bay, Scarborough, by Hedgehog Cycling

From Kirkbymoorside, the route continues via Sinnington (on the river Seven) and Wrelton to Pickering, for the second intermediate sprint.

North York Moors railway, Pickering

North York Moors railway, Pickering, by Kevin, Licence CC BY 2.0

From Pickering, the race continues on the A170 via Thornton Dale, Snainton, and Brompton-by-Sawdon. It forks left away from the A170 at the junction between West and East Ayton, on Castlegate/Seavegate. Here, the race follows the river Derwent through Forge Valley Woods National Nature Reserve to Hackness. (A monastery at Hackness was mentioned by Bede in the C8th. The church of St Peter has sections dating from the C11th. Hackness Hall, with landscaped gardens, was built around 1795. Hackness tennis club has grass and hard courts).

Now comes the second categorised climb of the stage, on Kirk Gate, called the Côte de Silpho.

Cinder Track near Scalby

Cinder Track at Scalby, by Hedgehog Cycling

After the climb, the riders follow Swang Road/Hay Lane to Scalby, on the outskirts of Scarborough. (Scalby is on the Cinder Track, walking, cycling, and horse-riding route between Scarborough and Whitby). Taking Station Road/Field Lane in Scalby, the race route joins the A165 and goes south through Scarborough, and out via Osgodby to Filey. There'll be lots of blue and yellow decorations in Filey, and the Filey Folk Festival coincides with Stage 3.

Filey

Filey, by Smabs Sputzer, Licence CC BY 2.0

The return from Filey to Scarborough is on the A1039 to Folkton, up Carr Lane to Cayton, on the B1261 to Irton, and via Stoney Haggs Road to the A64.

Now the route to the finish line is a familiar one from past Tours de Yorkshire. The A64 takes the riders past The Mere, then they follow Queen Margaret's Road to the A165, and fork right down Valley Road.

Rotunda Museum, Scarborough

Rotunda Museum, Scarborough, by Hedgehog Cycling

Then it's past the Rotunda Museum, and along South Bay on Foreshore Road; Marine Drive takes them around the promontory overlooked by Scarborough Castle. Finally, they reach North Bay on Royal Albert Drive, and the finish of Stage 3 is here.

Seafood stall, Scarborough

Seafood stall, Scarborough, by Hedgehog Cycling

Scarborough will have a spectator hub, with an open air theatre, a community cycle ride, music, a mountain bike show, assault course, and climbing. On the hillside overlooking North Bay, there'll be an animated piece of Land Art: the Big Bike Beat Band, a giant bike-shaped structure accompanied by a team of lively drummers.

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Tour de Yorkshire 2018

Beverley market place

All the news from the 2018 Tour de Yorkshire, and the routes of the four stages.

Read about the Tour de Yorkshire 2018.

Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: towns & places of interest on the route

Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Richmond

Richmond

Richmond, by Paul Arps, Licence CC BY 2.0

Richmond is a market town in North Yorkshire on the river Swale, with one of the largest cobbled market places in England.

It was founded in 1071, shortly after the Norman invasion, and was named after Richemont in Normandy. It is the UK's most duplicated placename, occurring 57 times worldwide. Richmond Castle was completed in 1086.

In the C17th and C18th, Richmond's prosperity grew due to the Swaledale wool industry and lead mining in Arkengarthdale. Fine Georgian houses were built at this time.

Richmond Barracks were completed in 1877.

One of the famous buildings in Richmond is The Georgian Theatre Royal.

Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Catterick Garrison

Catterick Garrison is the largest British Army garrison town, with a population of 13,000. It is near Richmond, in North Yorkshire.

It was Robert Baden-Powell (founder of the Scouts) who recommended the site instead of barracks at Richmond Castle, and a camp was built from 1914. It served as a PoW camp at the end of World War I. Further construction took place in the 1930s for a permanent military camp. It housed prisoners of war again in World War II.

One of Catterick Garrison's functions is as an Infantry Training Centre.

Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Leyburn

Bolton Arms, Leyburn

Leyburn is a market town with a population of 2,183. It's name is ley (meaning clearing) burn (stream).

It has a large market square, and Friday is market day. There is also a monthly farmers' market. 

Leyburn hosts the Dales Festival of Food and Drink (May Bank Holiday), and the Wensleydale Agricultural Show (end of August).

Many of the walks from Leyburn begin on Leyburn Shawl, a wooded escarpment to the west of the town, said to be named after a shawl dropped here by Mary Queen of Scots, as she tried to escape from Bolton Castle.

Leyburn has a station on the Wensleydale railway, a heritage steam railway which runs from Leeming Bar to Redmire, a distance of 16 miles. There are plans to extend it west to Castle Bolton, Aysgarth, Hawes, and Garsdale.

The Tottenham Hotspur and England footballer Michael Dawson comes from Leyburn.

Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Bedale

Bedale

Bedale, by Mick Knapton, Licence CC BY-SA 3.0

Bedale is a small town near the A1, between the Yorkshire Dales and the North York Moors. It's on Bedale Beck, a tributary of the river Swale.

The Bedale Hoard was found in 2012. There are silver and gold items from the C9th and C10th, now in the Yorkshire Museum.

Bedale has a station on the Wensleydale railway.

Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Northallerton

Northallerton High Street

Northallerton High Street, by James West, Flickr, Licence CC BY-SA 2.0

Northallerton is the county town of North Yorkshire, and has a population of 16,832 (2011 census).

The earliest settlement at Northallerton was a Roman military camp. After the Romans, Saxons lived at Northallerton, and built a wooden church in the 600s, and a stone church in 855. In the 900s, Danes settled in the area. In the Domesday Book, the settlement was described as Alvertune. The name may mean Aelfere's or Alfred's farm, or it may refer to Alder trees.

In the 1100s, Northallerton was given to the Bishop of Durham, and became an important religious centre.

Northallerton also developed into a market town, with cattle, sheep, and horses sold. It had four coaching inns, serving passengers on routes between London and Edinburgh. In 1841, the railway came to Northallerton (London to Edinburgh line). There was also a line to Ripon, closed in 1969 following the Beeching report.

Today, Northallerton still hosts livestock auctions. It is the HQ of North Yorkshire County Council, and Hambleton District Council. There is some light industry and commerce.

Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Thirsk

Thirsk

Thirsk, DSC_1525, by Paul Massey, Flickr, Licence CC BY-ND 2.0

Thirsk is a market town with a population of 4,998 (2011 census). It is on Cod Beck, with Old Thirsk to the east of the river, and the rest of the town, plus Sowerby, to the west.

There was a settlement in this location from 500-600BC. The name derives from the Old Norse presk, meaning fen or lake. In the Domesday Book, Thirsk is referred to as Tresche. Soon after the Norman invasion, most of the manor here was granted to Robert de Mowbray, and it remained in the Mowbray family for a long time, before passing to the Berkeley family, then the Bell family into the C20th.

Thirsk was home to veterinary surgeon James Alred Wight, who wrote under the name James Herriot. In his books, Thirsk becomes Darrowby. Wight worked from 23 Kirkgate, and the premises are now the World of James Herriot Museum. There's also a Thirsk Museum, which is in the house where Thomas Lord (after whom Lord's Cricket Ground is named) was born.

Thirsk racecourse is a venue for flat racing in spring and summer.

World of James Herriot, Thirsk

The World of James Herriot, by Patrick Gruban, Flickr, Licence CC BY-SA 2.0

Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Sutton Bank

Sutton Bank and Gormire Lake

Sutton Bank Gormire Lake, by Allan Harris, Flickr, Licence CC BY-ND 2.0

Sutton Bank is a steep hill in the North York Moors National Park, adjacent to Roulston Scar (site of an Iron Age hillfort from 400BC) and the White Horse of Kilburn. The White Horse was created in November 1857, on the initiative of Thomas Taylor, possibly by schoolmaster John Hodgson and his pupils.

The A170 climbs Sutton Bank, with a maximum gradient of 25%, and one hairpin bend - 20 fewer than Alpe d'Huez. From the top, there are views over the Vale of York. There's paying parking at the Sutton Bank National Park Centre, which has an exhibition on the glacial geography of the area (Lime & Ice), a tea shop, a gift shop, a viewing platform, an adventure play area, walking paths, and three mountain bike trails (three different lengths and levels of difficulty) plus a skills area. There's a bike hire shop, Sutton Bank Bikes

The National Park Centre organised family-friendly events for the Tour de Yorkshire 2016, including big-screen coverage of the whole race, and kids' time trials. They may well do so again in 2018.

Sutton Bank is steep, and faces the prevailing westerly winds, which makes it ideal for gliding. The Yorkshire Gliding Club is based on Roulston Scar.

Sutton Bank White Horse and Yorkshire Gliding Club

White Horse and Yorkshire Gliding Club Clubhouse, by Darren Clare, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2016: Helmsley

Helmsley Castle

Helmsley Castle, by Nick Wise, Flickr, Licence CC BY-ND 2.0

Helmsley is a market town on the river Rye, which is popular with tourists, and with bikers (who often ride the B1257 from Stokesley to Helmsley).

The Old English name of the settlement was Elmeslac, meaning Helm's forest clearing. Street names ending in 'gate' are an indication of later Viking presence here.

After the Norman Conquest, Helmsley was given to William's half-brother, the Count of Mortain. He built a castle (now ruined), and in Norman times the land to the west of the town (now Duncombe Park) was a royal deer park. 

Helmsley became a market town in 1191. Wool production and weaving were the main industries in the Middle Ages, in conjunction with nearby Rievaulx Abbey (until the Dissolution of the Monasteries).

Helmsley was acquired by Sir Charles Duncombe about 1689, and he developed Duncombe Park house and gardens to the south west of the town.

Today, the main employers in Helmsley are Duncombe Park Estate, Thomas's Bakery, and the North York Moors National Park Authority. There's a small industrial estate in the south east corner of Helmsley.

Visitor attractions include the castle visitor centre, and Helmsley Walled Garden. Helmsley Arts Centre has a 140-seat auditorium, and the town has an open-air swimming pool and recreation centre.

The Cleveland Way long distance path starts in Helmsley.

Hunter's, Helmsley

2014 05 06 Trip to Bransdale - Helmsley, by Keith Laverack, Flickr, Licence CC BY-ND 2.0

Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Kirkbymoorside

Kirkbymoorside

Kirkbymoorside, by Gareth, Licence CC BY 2.0

Kirkbymoorside is a market town with a population of 2,751 (2011 census).

It was called Chirchebi in the Domesday Book. Kirkbymoorside is on an old coaching route between York and Scarborough, and two coaching inns dating from the 1200s remain - the Black Swan and the George and Dragon.

Kirkbymoorside is home to Kirkbymoorside Town Brass Band and Kirkbymoorside Football Club.

Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Pickering

Pickering

Pickering, by Chris, Licence CC BY-SA 2.0

Pickering is market town in Ryedale, North Yorkshire, just south of the North York Moors National Park. Dalby Forest, a mountain-biking venue, is to the north east of the town.

The area was inhabited in the Roman period, and the town probably existed at the time of the Anglo-Saxons. Pickering Castle was built in the late C11th, after the Norman invasion.

Other than the castle, Pickering Parish Church is a main landmark, and stands by the market place.

The terminus of the North York Moors railway is in Pickering. It's an 18-mile heritage line to Whitby.

North York Moors railway, Pickering

North York Moors railway, Pickering, by Kevin, Licence CC BY 2.0

Stage 3, Tour de Yorskhire 2018: Filey

Filey

Filey, by Smabs Sputzer, Licence CC BY 2.0

Filey is a small fishing village and seaside resort in the Borough of Scarborough. It is at the eastern end of the Cleveland Way, and the northern end of the Yorkshire Wolds Way.

There used to be a Butlins just south of Filey until 1984, now redeveloped as The Bay Filey holiday homes.

Stage 3, Tour de Yorkshire 2018: Scarborough

Scarborough South Bay

Scarborough South Bay, by Hedgehog Cycling

Scarborough is the largest holiday resort on the Yorkshire coast. As well as tourism, Scarborians live from fishing, services, and the digital and creative industries. There's free wifi on the town's seafront and harbour.

The rocky promontory, with the ruins of Scarborough Castle on it, separates the sea front into North Bay and South Bay. South Bay is more popular and commercial, while North Bay is quieter, and has the Japanese-themed Peasholm Park. The miniature North Bay Railway runs from the park to Scalby Mills and the Sea Life Centre.

Scarborough may have been founded around 966AD as Skaroaborg by a Viking raider, but there was little left of any settlement by the time of the Domesday Book. 

Scarborough Castle was built under Henry II, and he granted charters for a market in 1155 and 1163. The royal charter for Scarborough Fair was granted in 1253. It was a 6-week trading festival, with merchants from all over Europe, and it continued for about 500 years. The castle and town suffered during the English Civil War of the 1640s, and they were badly damaged.

Scarborough's history as a spa town began when a spring was discovered in 1626, and more visitors came after it was publicised by Dr Wittie's book in 1660. The Scarborough to York railway (1845) meant further popularity.

Scarborough is associated with Alan Ayckbourn, and almost all his plays receive their first performance at the Stephen Joseph theatre.

The Rotunda museum is a national centre for geology - appropriate, as Scarborough is on Yorkshire's Jurassic Coast.

Richmond Wensleydale RailwayNorth Bay, Scarborough

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