Stage 11 Tour de France 2024

Stage 10 | Stage 11 | Stage 12

Le Lioran
Le Lioran, by Nouill, Licence CC BY-SA 4.0

Stage 11 of the Tour de France 2024 is a 211km mountain stage in the Massif Central, from Evaux-les-Bains to Le Lioran.

There's 4,350m of climbing, much of it coming towards the end of the stage. After two early climbs, later in the stage there are ascents of the Col de Néronne, Puy Mary Pas de Peyrol, Col de Pertus and Col de Font de Cère.

The top of the Col de Font de Cère is 3km before the finish at Le Lioran.

This could be a day for a breakaway, but also one when positions on General Classification change.

Stage 11 Tour de France 2024: Video Highlights and Blog

These are video highlights of Stage 11.



This is the Stage 11 blog/race report.

Race Details | Poll | Map & Profile | Timings | Videos | Food & Drink | Route Notes | Favourites

Stage 11 Tour de France 2024: Race Details

Race details - Stage 11, Tour de France 2024
Date Wednesday 10th July 2024
Stage classification Mountain
Distance 211km
Intermediate sprint Bourg-Lastic
Climbs Côte de Mouilloux (Cat. 4)
Côte de Larodde (Cat. 3)
Col de Néronne (Cat. 2)
Puy Mary Pas de Peyrol (Cat. 1)
Col de Pertus (Cat. 2) (Bonus Point)
Col de Font de Cère (Cat. 3)
Total climbing 4,350m

Stage 11 Tour de France 2024: Poll

Vote for one of the main contenders to win Stage 11.


Stage 11 Tour de France 2024: Map & Stage Profile

This is a map of the route of Stage 11, Tour de France 2024.

Map of Stage 11 Tour de France 2024
Map of Stage 11 Tour de France 2024, ©ASO/Tour de France

This is a zoom-able map of the route of Stage 11 of the 2024 Tour de France.


Note: this routemap was produced a long time in advance of the race, and could be subject to changes.

This is the profile of Stage 11 Tour de France 2024.

Profile of Stage 11 Tour de France 2024
Profile of Stage 11 Tour de France 2024, © ASO/Tour de France

Stage 11 Tour de France 2024: Timings

Timings - Stage 11, Tour de France 2024

Caravan Fast Schedule Slow Schedule
Start Time (départ fictif) 0920
1120
1120
Start Time (départ réel) 0930
1130
1130
Intermediate Sprint Bourg-Lastic 1121
1310
1321
Pas de Peyrol (Puy Mary) Climb 1439
1611
1644
Finish Line (211km) 1532
1654
1731

Stage 11 Tour de France 2024: Videos

This is a video of the route of Stage 11 Tour de France 2024.

The finale of Stage 11, including the series of climbs, is the same as that of Stage 5 of the 2016 Tour de France.

In 2016, Romain Bardet (AG2R) did a reconnaissance of the final part of Stage 5, from Mandailles-St-Julien via the Col du Perthus to the finish at le Lioran. France 3 had a full report.

They said that this stage was more or less a 'home' stage for Bardet. He was born in Brioude, in the Haute Loire, not a million miles from here, and he lived in Clermont Ferrand.

'It'll be special for me, with my in-laws at the start, and my own family at the finish, on roads I know by heart.'

Ultimately it was not Romain Bardet but Greg van Avermaet who won Stage 5 of the 2016 Tour from Limoges to Le Lioran. Here are video highlights.



Food and Drink to Go with Stage 11 Tour de France 2024

Gentiane
Gentiane

Today's stage finishes in the Massif Central mountains, in the Auvergne (which is a cultural region, not an official administrative region).

The Auvergne has produced wine since Roman times, and in the C11th it had over 10,000 hectares of vineyards. It is not necessarily one of France's most celebrated wine-producing areas today, though.

Instead if you want to sample a local alcohol, why not try Gentiane? It is made with the root of the gentian plant. Génépi, made in the Alps, uses the plant itself to create a similar liqueur.

Buy a bottle of Gentiane liqueur (affiliate link).

The Auvergne is not renowned as one of the most famous regions of France for food and drink, but it does make some excellent cheeses. Cantal is one of the best-known.

Local blue cheeses include Bleu d'Auvergne, Rochebaron, Bleu de Chèvre (which is, as you would expect from the name, blue cheese made from goat's milk), Saint Agur, and Fourme d'Ambert.

Puy lentils, lentilles vertes du Puy, have been grown in the region for centuries. Truffade is a thick potato and cheese pancake.


Stage 11 Tour de France 2024: Route Notes

The stage starts in Evaux-les-Bains (départ fictif).

Evaux-les-Bains

Evaux-les-Bains
Evaux-les-Bains, by Martpan, Licence CC BY-SA 4.0

Evaux-les-Bains was founded by the Romans in the C1st AD.

They developed thermal baths here, and called the place Ivaonum, perhaps after a god called Ivaos.

The Roman baths were abandoned in the 400s, but the spa waters became popular again in the 1600s and 1800s.

The nearest big town is Montluçon.


The peloton rolls out of Evaux-les-Bains heading south on the D996. The départ réel is soon after a hamlet called Les Fresses.

The race heads south via Rougnat to Auzances.

Auzances
Auzances, by Yzergues, Licence CC BY-SA 4.0

Jean Taillandier, who was goalkeeper for the French football team in 1960, was born in Auzances.

Now Stage 11 takes the D4, which follows the course of the river Cher then its tributary, le Mas. The road leads to Dontreix.

The road passes some lakes and becomes the D206 on the way to Montel-de-Gelat.

Then the D82 takes the race south to Condat-en-Combraille and Herment.

Herment
Herment, public domain image

Herment stands on a small hill. There's a walk around the town called the Promenade des Murs, because it's where the town walls used to be.

There are views of some of the volcanic peaks of the Auvergne from Herment.

Next the stage follows the D987 to Lastic, then Bourg-Lastic.

Intermediate Sprint at Bourg-Lastic

Bourg-Lastic
Bourg-Lastic, by AirScott, Licence CC BY-SA 4.0

The intermediate sprint is at Bourg-Lastic, after 65km raced.

Following an attack by the Resistance on a German convoy in 1944, 29 people including the local Mayor were executed by the Nazis.

The race continues to Les Gannes and Messeix, a former coal-mining village.

The peloton then follows the twists and turns of the D73 through woods and across the Dordogne river. After crossing the river, the first categorised climb of the day looms - the Côte de Mouilloux.

Côte de Mouilloux (Category 4)

The Côte de Mouilloux climb is 1.9km at an average 6.3%. The top is at a height of 715m after 79.8km raced.

The next climb is near the village of Larodde.

Côte de Larodde (Category 3)

The Côte de Larodde is 3.8km at an average 6%. The top is at height of 803m after 89.7km raced.

The route continues to Trémouille-Saint-Loup, then joins the D922. The D-road leads via Lanobre to Bort-les-Orgues, a town by a dam of the Dordogne river.

Bort-les-Orgues
Bort-les-Orgues, public domain image

Bort's prosperity was built on leather and textiles.

The dam has created the Lac de Bort-les-Orgues.

Lac de Bort-les-Orgues
Lac de Bort-les-Orgues, by Raimond Spekking, Licence CC BY-SA 4.0

The D922 continues to Ydes, another coal-mining village.

From Ydes, it follows a river called la Sumène to Vendes.

Still on the D922, now called Route de la Sapinière, the riders head up an unclassified climb to Le Vigean, at a height of 712m. Here they leave the D922.

Now on the D678, Stage 11 heads east to the valley of the Mars. The D12 follows the course of the river Mars south east past the Château de Longevergne.

Chateau de Longevergne
Château de Longevergne, by Orangemeca06, Licence CC BY 4.0

The route continues in the Mars valley via Saint-Vincent-de-Salers to Le Falgoux.

Le Falgoux
Le Falgoux, by Patrick Nouhailler, Licence CC BY-SA 3.0

It's from Le Falgoux that the climbing starts. This part of the route is essentially the same as Stage 5 of the 2016 Tour.

This is the profile of the end of the stage, from Le Falgoux to the finish.

Profile of the climbs on Stage 11 TDF 2024
Profile of the climbs on Stage 11 TDF 2024, ©ASO/Tour de France

The first climb is to the Col de Néronne. This col is the link between the Mar valley and the Maronne valley.

Col de Néronne (Category 2)

Puy Violent
Puy Violent, seen from Salers, by B Navez, Licence CC BY-SA 3.0

The Col de Néronne is overlooked by the not-so-charmingly-named Puy Violent (1592m). In fact its name is a corruption of the Occitan Pueg Bialant, which may mean something like 'bleating mountain', and refer to the large flocks of sheep which were grazed here.

The Col de Néronne climb is steep - 3.8km at an average gradient of 9.1%. The height at the top is 1,242m, after 168.7km raced.

There's an inn at the top, the Auberge du Col de Neronne.

Beyond the Col de Neronne, on the D680, the road skirts around the Roc du Merle, then there's a section called the Cirque du Falgoux, on the edge of a forest, following the river Mars up towards its source. By the foot of the climb of the Pas de Peyrol, the road has dropped around 100m.

Puy Mary Pas de Peyrol (Category 1)

View of Pas de Peyrol from Puy Mary
Pas de Peyrol from Puy Mary, by Benoit Kornmann, Licence CC BY-SA 3.0

The climb of the Pas de Peyrol begins now. It starts at 1150m and the summit is 1589m, giving a height difference of 439m. The distance is 5.4km, making an average gradient of 8.1%. It's particularly steep (15%) near the top.

The KOM point comes after 180km raced.

This Pas de Peryol is a col between two summits - the Puy de la Tourte (1704m) and the Puy Mary (1787m). It's the highest col in the Massif Central.

There's a restaurant at the Pas de Peyrol, and la Maison du Site, which is a tourist office/exhibition explaining the volcanic formation of the mountains here. Steps lead to the top of the Puy Mary.

Puy Mary from the Pas de Peyrol
Puy Mary from the Pas de Peyrol, by Patrick Nouhailler, Flickr, Licence CC BY-SA 2.0

From the Pas de Peyrol, the riders take the D17 to the Col de Redondet (1529m), then down to Mandailles-St-Julien (960m) near the head of the Jordanne valley.

This is where the ascent of the Col du Pertus begins.

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Col du Pertus (Category 2) (Bonus Point)

Col de Pertus
Col de Pertus, by SchiDD, Licence CC BY-SA 3.0

The altitude at the start of the climb is 960m, and the summit is at 1309m, giving a height difference of 349m. The distance is 4.4km, at an average gradient of 7.9%.

The top of the climb comes after 196.4km raced.

This is a Bonus Point - time bonuses of 8s, 5s and 2s available to the first three riders.

From the Col du Perthus, there's a descent to St-Jacques-des-Blats (998m), where the riders turn left on the N122, which takes them gently uphill alongside the Cère.

They turn left on the D67 before the Tunnel du Lioran, then left again on a minor road to climb the Col de Font de Cère (1294m).

Col de Font de Cère (Category  3)

The Col de Font de Cère (meaning the col of the sources of the Cère) is less challenging than the Pas de Peyrol and the Col du Pertus. The start is a little after St-Jacques-des-Blats, at 1,121m; the riders climb to 1294m at the top.

The distance is 3.3km, at an average gradient of 5.8%. The top is after 208.2km raced.

There's a hotel at the top, le Buron de Font de Cère. It's nearly all downhill from here.

The Finish at le Lioran

Monts du Cantal & Super Lioran
Monts du Cantal & Super Lioran, by Peter Stevens, Flickr, Licence CC BY 2.0

The finish is at le Lioran.

From the Col de Font de Cère the riders follow the road down through the woods to Font d'Alagnon. It's called the route Impériale, but it's a very minor road.

Then they take the Route du Plomb du Cantal up to Super Lioran and the finish line. The final kilometre or so is an uphill drag at 3.9%.

It's almost exactly the same finish as in 2016, see this map.

Map of finish of Stage 5 in le Lorian

Le Lioran

Téléphérique du Lioran
Téléphérique le Lioran, by Sylvain Naudin, Flickr, Licence CC BY-SA 2.0

Le Lioran is a resort in the monts du Cantal (also known as the Volcan du Cantal), the Parc Naturel Régional des Volcans d'Auvergne, and the Massif Central.

It is at the head of the Alagnon valley, and surrounded by mountains: the Plomb du Cantal (1855m) to the south, the Puy Griou (1694m) to the west, and the Puy de Bataillouse (1683m) and the Roche de Vascivières (1700m) to the north.

The lower slopes are forested, and the peaks are open and exposed. There's skiing in the winter, and walking and mountain biking in the summer.

The area is rich in fauna. There are red and other types of deer, wild boar, mouflons, marmottes, chamois, and even wolves.

Until the end of the C18th, the area was little visited by people. There were deep woods populated by bears and wolves, and snow on the col for a large part of the year. Then, the Route Royale (now the N122) was built, and it became more accessible. The road tunnel under the Col de Font de Cère was built from 1839 to 1843, and a railway was constructed in 1865.

Le Lioran began to develop as a tourist resort with the opening of its first hotel in 1896. Skiing began in 1906, and the Ski Club du Lorian was founded in 1908.

There was active resistance here during World War II, culminating in the Bataille du Lioran in August 1944.

Super Lioran
Station le Lioran, by Sylvain Naudin, Flickr, Licence CC BY-SA 2.0

The first ski lift was installed in 1947, and the most significant, la Plomb du Cantal, was opened by President Georges Pompidou in 1967. As well as downhill skiing, there are cross-country ski trails.

The Plomb du Cantal cable car and the Masseboeuf chairlift are used for mountain biking in the summer. Le Lioran is the biggest mountain biking area in the Massif Central, with 16 trails totalling more than 100km, and a Bike Park.


Stage 11 Tour de France 2024: the Favourites

Santiago Buitrago
Santiago Buitrago, by Hoebele, CC BY-SA 4.0

Greg van Avermaet won in Le Lioran from a breakaway in 2016. While it's always possible that Pogacar will win here, let's say it'll be another breakaway day in 2024.

As a left-field pick, what about Santiago Buitrago?

Who do you think will win Stage 11 of the 2024 Tour de France?




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