Stage 17 Tour de France 2024

Stage 16 | Stage 17 | Stage 18

Superdévoluy
Superdévoluy, by Gonioul, Licence CC BY-SA 3.0

Stage 17 of the Tour de France 2024 is a 177.8km mountain stage from Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux to Superdévoluy.

It's fairly flat early on, in the Drôme département. The last 40km, after Gap, features climbs of the Col Bayard and the Col du Noyer.

The total climbing on the stage is 2,850m.

The terrain should favour the formation of a big breakaway group, and they could fight it out for the stage win on the final ascent to the finish line at Superdévoluy.

Race Details | Poll | Map & Profile | Timings | Videos | Food & Drink | Route Notes | Favourites

Stage 17 Tour de France 2024: Race Details

Race details - Stage 17, Tour de France 2024
Date Wednesday 17th July 2024
Stage classification Mountain
Distance 177.8km
Intermediate sprint Veynes
Climbs Col Bayard (Cat. 2)
Col du Noyer (Cat. 1) (Bonus Point)
Côte de Superdévoluy (Cat. 3)

Stage 17 Tour de France 2024: Poll

Vote for one of the main contenders to win Stage 17 (to be added later).

Stage 17 Tour de France 2024: Map & Stage Profile

This is a map of the route of Stage 17, Tour de France 2024.

Map of Stage 17 Tour de France 2024
Map of Stage 17 Tour de France 2024, ©ASO/Tour de France

This is a zoom-able map of the route of Stage 17 of the 2024 Tour de France.


Note: this routemap was produced a long time in advance of the race, and could be subject to changes.

This is the profile of Stage 17 Tour de France 2024.

Profile of Stage 17 Tour de France 2024
Profile of Stage 17 Tour de France 2024, © ASO/Tour de France

Stage 17 Tour de France 2024: Timings

Timings - Stage 17, Tour de France 2024

Caravan Fast Schedule Slow Schedule
Start Time (départ fictif) 1035
1235
1235
Start Time (départ réel) 1045
1245
1245
Intermediate Sprint Veynes 1346
1518
1533
Col du Noyer Climb 1507
1642
1708
Finish Line (177.8km) 1526
1658
1726

Stage 17 Tour de France 2024: Videos

This is a video of the route of Stage 17 Tour de France 2024.

The Dauphiné finished at Superdévoluy on Stage 7 of the 2016 edition. Steve Cummings won that day.



Food and Drink to Accompany Stage 17 Tour de France 2024

Cotes de Provence
Côtes de Provence (affiliate link)

Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux is not far from Montélimar, well-known for nougat.

Nougat may have originated in the Middle East, but the recipe made its way to Provence where almonds had been grown for centuries.

It was in 1701 that a pair of dukes passed through Montélimar and were given nougat. They were the old-days equivalent of celebrities (something like Rylan and Charlotte Church, perhaps), and they helped nougat's fame spread.

Nougat is made from almonds, honey, and a light mousse of egg whites.

As the stage starts in Provence, you could sip a Côtes de Provence rosé while watching it.

Buy a bottle of Côtes de Provence (affiliate link).


Stage 17 Tour de France 2024: Route Notes

The stage starts in Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux (départ fictif).

Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux

Saint-Paul-Trois-Chateaux
Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux, Licence CC BY-SA 2.5

Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux is a small town in the Drôme département, on the east bank of the river Rhône.

Saint-Paul was the first Bishop here in the C4th.

The origin of the name 'trois châteaux' or 'three castles' results from a misunderstanding. A Celtic tribe called the Tricastini lived here, and their town was called Noviomagus Tricastinorum in Latin, meaning 'new market of the Tricastini'.

Tricastinorum was misunderstood as being 'of the three castles' at some point in history, and translated into French as such.

Tricastin nuclear power station
Tricastin nuclear power station, by Marianne Casamance, Licence CC BY-SA 4.0

Wine is produced locally, under the Appellation d'Origine Controllée Grignan-les-Adhémar.

It was previously called Côteaux du Tricastin, but the association of the name Tricastin with the local nuclear power station was probably unhelpful - nobody likes to think they're drinking nuclear wine.

Black truffles are harvested in the area, and olive oil is produced.

The ruins of Roman ramparts are visible here.

Saint-Paul has a C12th Cathedral.


The départ réel is near the Etang Saint-Louis, on the road to Suze-la-Rousse.

Suze-la-Rousse chateau
Suze-la-Rousse, by Jacquym, Licence CC BY-SA 4.0

Suze-la-Rousse château was built in the 1100s by the Princes of Orange.

Next, the stage takes the relatively major D94 through vineyards to Tulette, and on via Saint-Maurice-sur-Eygues to Nyons.

Saint-Maurice-sur-Eygues
Saint-Maurice-sur-Eygues, by Marianne Casamance, Licence CC BY-SA 4.0

Nyons

Nyons
Nyons, public domain image

Nyons is a town on the river Eygues (or Aigues) which was settled by Celtic tribes around 500BC. It was called Nyrax at that time.

Nyons is well-known for olive-growing. It is twinned with Nyon in Switzerland.

The route continues by the river Eygues through Aubres. Aubres is overlooked by the Vieux Village d'Aubres, which dates from the Medieval era but was abandoned in the 1800s. There are olive trees here.

The next villages are Les Pilles and Sahune, then the riders go through the Gorges de l'Eygues and the hamlet of Saint-May.

Saint-May
View from Saint-May, by Symac, Licence CC BY-SA 3.0

The route continues to Rosans.

Rosans
Rosans, by Johnnyzoom, Licence CC BY 3.0

There's something of a climb from Rosans to the Col de Saulce (877m), then the next village is Serres.

Serres

Serres
Serres, by Lion59, Licence CC BY-SA 3.0

Like Eze, Laval and Sarras, Serres' name is a palindrome.

In Medieval times, Serres was a fortress that guarded the entrance to a pass through which the river Buëch flows.

Now the peloton heads up the river Buëch then the Petit Buëch to Veynes, where the intermediate sprint takes place.

Intermediate Sprint at Veynes

Veynes
Veynes, by AirScott, Licence CC BY-SA 4.0

The intermediate sprint at Veynes comes after 114.8km raced.

The route continues to La Roche-des-Arnauds. Stage 17 is now approaching Gap.

Gap

Gap
Gap, by Le Corrigateur, Licence CC BY-SA 4.0

Gap is a town of 41,000 people. It is the Préfecture of the Hautes-Alpes département.

Its name evolved from Vappum, somehow or other.

It was inhabited by the Celto-Ligurian tribe the Tricorii, and conquered by the Romans in 125-4 BC.

A Roman road was built along the valley of the Durance from 14 to 6BC, linking Turin to Sisteron. Gap (Vapincum) was one of the stations along the route. It was a Roman camp, occupied by around 360 men.

Napoléon Bonaparte stopped in Gap in March 1815 after leaving Elba, at the start of his 100 days that ended in defeat at Waterloo.

Gap is twinned with Pinerolo, Italy.


Route Napoléon

Napoléon
Napoléon painting by Jacques-Louis David, public domain image

The Route Napoléon is the road Bonaparte followed after leaving Elba in February 1815.

Bonaparte was sent to Elba in April 1814 and a Bourbon King, Louis XVIII, restored in France. By February 1815, many of Bonaparte's old soldiers were disgruntled with the new arrangements.

Napoléon left Elba at the end of February 1815 and landed on mainland France near Antibes, on the south coast.

'I will arrive in Paris without firing a shot', he exclaimed. He headed north west on a bad road to Grasse, Digne-les-Bains, Sisteron and Gap, intending to pick up recruits on the way. This road is what is known today as the Route Napoléon.

Continuing on his way, he was welcomed in Grenoble and Lyon, and made it to Paris by 20th March 1815.

This led to Napoléon's final defeat at Waterloo, and subsequent exile to St Helena.


From Gap, the race heads north on the Route Napoléon to Col Bayard.

Col Bayard (Category 2)

Col Bayard
Col Bayard, by Aups, Licence CC BY-SA 3.0

Col Bayard is a pass between the catchment area of the Durance to the south and the Isère to the north.

It is regarded as the line between Alpine vegetation and agriculture to the north and Mediterranean vegetation and agriculture to the south.

The climb of the Col Bayard is 6.8km at an average 7.3% to a height of 1,246m after 145.7km raced.

The race continues on the Route Napoléon as far as Saint-Bonnet-en-Champsaur, then forks left on a minor road up to the Col du Noyer.

Skiing Made Easy

Skiing Made Easy
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Skiing Made Easy is a practical guide to learning to ski based on many happy seasons of ski teaching.

It takes you through the beginner's progression from snowplough to parallel turns, starting at the very beginning and not assuming any prior knowledge.

The book suggests relevant exercises to develop and improve your skills. Common faults are identified, along with the best ways to correct them.

'By the way' sections contain information about many of the little things that people assume you just know, but you may not.

'This is the book I wish I'd had when I started skiing' - reviewer on Amazon.

How to buy:


Col du Noyer (Category 1) (Bonus Point)

Col du Noyer
Col du Noyer, by Fr.Letreille, Licence CC BY-SA 3.0

The Col du Noyer has a road that was built in the 1850s to replace an old mule track. It links Dévoluy to the Champsaur valley.

The 'refuge Napoléon' is one of six built in the area in the 1850s. It is now a bar-restaurant.

The Col du Noyer has featured in the Tour de France four times: 1970, 1971, 1982 and 2010.

It is 7.5km at an average 8.1% to a height of 1,664m after 166.3km raced.

Profile of Col du Noyer and Superdevoluy
Profile of Col du Noyer and Superdévoluy, ©ASO/Tour de France

The Col du Noyer is the Bonus Point, meaning there are time bonuses of 8s, 5s and 2s for the first three riders over the top.

From the Col du Noyer there's a descent with hairpin bends. It brings the riders to Saint-Etienne-en-Dévoluy.

This just leaves the final climb of the Côte de Superdévoluy to the finish.

The Final Climb to Superdévoluy

The final climb is called the Côte de Superdévoluy, and it is relatively easy.

It is 3.8km at an average 5.9%, to a height of 1,502m.

Superdévoluy

Superdévoluy
Superdévoluy, by Gonioul, Licence CC BY-SA 3.0

The Stage 17 finish town is Superdévoluy.

It is a ski resort built in 1966. Together with the linked resort of La Joue du Loup, there are 100km of pistes.

Up on the Plateau de Bure is a set of satellite dishes which make up the Northern Extended Millimeter Array (NOEMA) - an astronomical facility with a radio telescope.


Stage 17 Tour de France 2024: the Favourites

Romain Bardet
Romain Bardet, by Petit Brun, Licence CC BY-SA 2.0

Christian Prudhomme thinks that the winner of Stage 17 will come from a breakaway.

If we assume that Romain Bardet has lost time on GC by this point of the race, he could be hunting stages. I can see him dropping the rest of a breakaway on the Col du Noyer and soloing to victory at Superdévoluy.

Who do you think will win Stage 17 of the 2024 Tour de France?




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